"Three simple words which will help you change the life of a young person, ‘Give a damn!’"
Louise Riley
For Louise, when it comes to discipline, behaviour and bringing the best out of even our most troubled young people, it all boils down to relationships.

And with many years experience on the front line in some quite challenging inner city schools in Manchester, Merseyside and The Potteries, who are we to argue with her?

Recently ‘headhunted’ for a role as an improvement director for an academy trust, Louise has been a vice principal with a specific brief for inclusion, has headed up a Pupil Referral Unit, has been an Alternative Provision coordinator and is also the Chair of Governors at a special school. She is adamant that the ‘quick fix’ mentality that so many schools seem forced to go down when working with children with clear social and emotional challenges does more harm than good. It’s way of working with young people that has, in her words, ‘no heart beat or pulse’ and goes against the idea of seeing time spent with young people in terms of an investment.

If you want to make a difference then invest time in getting to really know and understand these amazing individuals who surround you every day. Loyalty knows no bounds.’

A passionate advocate of student voice and participation, Louise describes her ‘wrap-around approach’ as one which combines trust and respect in a way that allows learning to take place.

To read more about Louise Riley please click here

  • Louise joined Independent Thinking in 2016

  • Louise’s DBS number is 001501881603 issued 16th September 2015

  • Click here to see our price guide

Events

Governor Event

Being a governor is an incredibly important task these days so we are delighted when we are asked to support them in their work in all sorts of schools around the country. Apart from ensuring the event is an entertaining and enjoyable one for all, especialy as it is so often on a rainy Saturday, we make sure our input is informative, relevant, up to date and guarantees all governors go back into their schools knowing what to look for, what to do and the rights sorts of questions to ask.

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